Apple Cracks Down On Subscription Scam Apps

Apple says it will roll out a new privacy control in the spring to prevent iPhone apps from secretly shadowing people.

The delay in its anticipated rollout aims to placate Facebook and other digital services that depend on such data surveillance to help sell ads.

Although Apple did not provide a specific date, the general timetable disclosed on Thursday means a long-awaited feature known as App Tracking Transparency will be part of an iPhone software update likely to arrive in late March or some point in April.

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After delaying the planned September introduction of the safeguard amid a Facebook-led outcry, Apple had previously said it would come out early this year.

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1 day ago  Apple says it will roll out a new privacy control in spring 2021 to prevent iPhone apps from secretly shadowing people. Has lost a lawsuit against a company called Corellium LLC, which has built a virtualized version of the iOS operating system for security testing purposesCorellium was co-founded in 201. Apple appears to be ridding the App Store of so-called 'scammy' apps after multiple media outlets exposed questionable pricing tactics that dupe users into expensive subscriptions.

Apple released the latest update as part of Data Privacy Day, which chief executive Tim Cook will salute during a speech scheduled for Thursday at a technology conference in Europe.

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Apple has been holding off to give Facebook and other app makers more time to adjust to a feature that will require iPhone users to give their explicit consent to being tracked.

This site contains user submitted content, comments and opinions and is for informational purposes only. Apple may provide or recommend responses as a possible solution based on the information provided; every potential issue may involve several factors not detailed in the conversations captured in an electronic forum and Apple can therefore provide no guarantee as to the. Apple yanks subscription scam apps, but leaves a bigger problem intact. Jeremy Horwitz @horwitz October 18, 2018 12:30 PM Mobile. Image Credit: Forbes. When it comes to customer expectations, the.

Analysts expect a significant number of users to deny that permission once it requires their assent. Currently, iPhone users are frequently tracked by apps they install unless they take the extra step of going into iPhone settings to prevent it.

Facebook stepped up its attacks on Apple’s new privacy control last month in a series of full-page ads in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and other national newspapers.

That campaign suggested some free digital services will be hobbled if they cannot compile personal information to customise ads.

On Wednesday, Facebook boss Mark Zuckerberg questioned Apple’s motives with the changes, saying the iPhone maker “has every incentive” to use its own mobile platform to interfere with rivals to its own messaging app.

“Apple may say that they are doing this to help people, but the moves clearly track their competitive interests,” Mr Zuckerberg said.

Google, which also relies on personal data to power the internet’s biggest ad network, has not joined Facebook in its criticism of Apple’s forthcoming controls on tracking.

But Google warned in a Wednesday blog post that Apple’s new controls will have a significant impact on ad revenue generated from iPhones in its digital network. Google said a “handful” of its iPhone apps will be affected by the new requirement, but did not identify which ones.

“We remain committed to preserving a vibrant and open app ecosystem where people can access a broad range of ad-supported content with confidence that their privacy and choices are respected,” wrote Christophe Combette, group product manager for Google Ads.

Apple also released an 11-page report to illustrate how much apps can learn about their users in daily life.

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Misleading iOS 'security' apps are about to be a thing of the past.

Apple has updated its developer guidelines with a new policy that bans deceptive 'virus-scanning' apps for the first time.

SEE ALSO: Apple’s biggest announcement won’t be the iPhone 8, but HOW you use it

From the latest App Store guidelines:

You should not market your app on the App Store or offline as including content or services that it does not actually offer (e.g. iOS-based virus and malware scanners). Egregious or repeated behavior is grounds for removal from the Developer Program. We work hard to make the App Store a trustworthy ecosystem and expect our app developers to follow suit; if you’re dishonest, we don’t want to do business with you.

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A quick search of the App Store also suggests that Apple has been quietly removing many of the apps that purport to have such capabilities, as search terms like 'virus scanner' and 'malware finder' no longer turn up results for these types of apps.

It's incredibly misleading for apps to advertise themselves as having these types of features

As the company notes in its guidelines, it's incredibly misleading for apps to advertise themselves as having these types of features. Not because it's impossible for malicious code to find its way into the App Store (though rare, it has happened), but because Apple's developer policies make it literally impossible for any third-party app to identify such malicious code in the first place.

What's most surprising is that it's taken Apple this long to crack down on these types of apps in the first place. Although they weren't always a big problem, it became a bigger issue over the last year as Apple automated more if its app review process, making it easier for ill-intentioned developers to sneak scammy apps into the store.

Apple's new search ads, which allows developers to advertise their apps against popular search terms in the App Store, further complicated the issue. As we highlighted back in June, a number of developers were abusing search ads by promoting scammy 'virus cleaner' and 'antivirus' apps that tricked users into paying huge subscription fees for services they didn't provide.

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But by now cracking down on the entire category, the company is finally working to get these apps out for good.