Cooey Model 600 Owners Manual

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WARNING.

FAILURE TO FOLLOW ANY OF THE FOLLOWING WARNINGS COULD RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH.

As a gun owner, you accept a set of demanding responsibilities. How seriously you take these responsibilities can be the difference between life and death. There is no excuse for careless or abusive handling of any firearm. At all times handle this firearm and all other firearms with intense respect for their power and potential danger. Please read and understand all of the cautions, warnings, notices, proper handling procedures and instructions outlined in your owner’s manual before using your new firearm.

1. ALWAYS KEEP THE MUZZLE OF YOUR FIREARM POINTED IN A SAFE DIRECTION EVEN THOUGH YOU ARE CERTAIN IT IS UNLOADED.
Never point any firearm at anything you do not intend to shoot. Be extremely alert and aware of all persons and property within the range of your ammunition.

2. NEVER RELY TOTALLY ON YOUR FIREARM’S MECHANICAL “SAFETY” DEVICE. LIKE ANY MECHANICAL DEVICE, A “SAFETY” CAN SOMETIMES FAIL; IT CAN BE JARRED OR INADVERTENTLY MANIPULATED INTO AN UNSAFE CONDITION.
The word “safety” describes a firearm’s trigger block mechanism, sear block mechanism, hammer block mechanism or firing pin block mechanism. Mechanical “safeties” are designed to place your firearm in a safer status, and no guarantee can be made that the firearm will not fire even if the “safety” is in the on safe position. Mechanical “safeties” merely aid safe gun handling and are no excuse for pointing your firearm’s muzzle in an unsafe direction. See “Operation of the Safety” [in your firearm's owner's manual] for instructions on the operation of this firearm’s “safety.”

Remember, safe gun handling does not stop with your firearm’s mechanical “safety” devices, it starts there. Always treat this firearm with the respect due a loaded, ready-to-fire firearm.

Some firearms do not have a mechanical “safety.” Many target firearms, lever-action firearms and pistols do not have manual “safety” mechanisms. Therefore it is critical to read and understand the owner’s manual for every firearm which explains the safe operation of the firearm.

While it is a good idea to test your firearm’s mechanical “safety” periodically for proper function, never test the “safety” while your firearm is loaded or pointed in an unsafe direction.

3. WHENEVER YOU HANDLE ANY FIREARM, OR HAND IT TO SOMEONE, ALWAYS OPEN THE ACTION IMMEDIATELY AND VISUALLY CHECK THE FIREARM’S CHAMBER TO MAKE CERTAIN THAT THE FIREARM IS COMPLETELY UNLOADED.
Make certain the firearm does not inadvertently contain any ammunition. Remember, merely removing the magazine does not mean the chamber is unloaded. Always keep the chamber empty and the “safety” in the on safe position unless shooting is imminent.

4. ALWAYS WEAR EAR AND EYE PROTECTION WHEN SHOOTING.
Unprotected, repeated exposure to gunfire can cause hearing damage. Wear hearing protection (shooting earplugs or muffs) to guard against such damage.

Wear shooting glasses to protect your eyes from flying particles. Allow proper distance (eye relief) between a scope and your eye when firing a scoped rifle, shotgun or pistol. Do not use unorthodox shooting methods that could cause the rearward travel of the slide or bolt of a firearm to contact your eyes, face or hands. Always keep a safe distance between the muzzle of your firearm and any persons nearby, as muzzle blast, debris and ejecting shells could inflict serious injury.

Always wear eye protection when disassembling and cleaning any firearm to prevent the possibility of springs, spring-tensioned parts, solvents or other agents from contacting your eyes.

5. KEEP ALL FIREARMS UNLOADED DURING TRANSPORT, EVEN WHEN STORED IN A HOLSTER, GUN CASE, SCABBARD OR OTHER CONTAINER.

6. DROPPING OR JARRING A LOADED FIREARM CAN CAUSE ACCIDENTAL DISCHARGE.
This can occur even with the “safety” in the on safe position. Be extremely careful while hunting or during any shooting activity to avoid dropping any firearm.

7. HUNTING FROM ELEVATED SURFACES SUCH AS TREESTANDS IS DANGEROUS.
Doing so may increase the risk of mishandling a firearm. The following rules should always be observed by you and those you hunt with. Always make certain that the stand being used is safe and stable. Always make certain that your firearm is unloaded when it is being taken up and down from the stand. Always make certain that your firearm is not dropped from the stand, or dropped while it is being taken up or down from the stand.

Remember, a loaded firearm may discharge when dropped, even with the “safety” in the on safe position.

8. STORE YOUR FIREARM AND AMMUNITION SEPARATELY, WELL BEYOND THE REACH OF CHILDREN.
Take prudent safeguards to ensure your firearm does not become available to untrained, inexperienced or unwelcome hands. Store all firearms in secure, locked cases or a gun safe. Keep your firearm unloaded when not in use.

9. BEWARE OF BARREL OBSTRUCTIONS.
Mud, snow and an infinite variety of other objects may inadvertently lodge in a barrel bore. It only takes a small obstruction to cause dangerously increased pressures that can damage your firearm and cause serious injury to yourself and others.

BEFORE CHECKING FOR A BARREL OBSTRUCTION, BE CERTAIN YOUR FIREARM IS COMPLETELY UNLOADED, THERE IS NOT A LIVE SHELL IN THE CHAMBER AND THE “SAFETY” IS IN THE ON SAFE POSITION.

After ensuring that the firearm is completely unloaded, open the breech or action and look through the barrel to be sure it is clear of obstructions. If an obstruction is seen, no matter how small it may be, clean the bore with a cleaning rod and patch as described [in your firearm's owner's manual]

10. BE ALERT TO THE SIGNS OF AMMUNITION MALFUNCTION. IF YOU DETECT AN OFF SOUND OR LIGHT RECOIL WHEN A SHELL IS FIRED, DO NOT LOAD ANOTHER SHELL INTO THE CHAMBER.
If your firearm fails to fire, keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction for a minimum of 30 seconds. Rotate the ejection area of the firearm away from you, carefully open the action and remove the shell from the chamber. If the primer is indented, the defective shell should be disposed of in a way that cannot cause harm. If the primer is not indented, your firearm should be examined by a qualified gunsmith and the cause of the malfunction corrected before further use. Glance down the barrel to make sure that no obstructions remain in the barrel. Completely clear the barrel before loading and firing again. Failure to follow these instructions can cause extensive damage to your firearm and possible serious injury to yourself and others.

11. NEVER INSERT A CARTRIDGE OF THE INCORRECT CALIBER OR GAUGE INTO ANY FIREARM.
The caliber or gauge of your firearm is marked on the barrel. Store all catridges of different calibers or gauges in completely separate and well-marked containers. Never store cartridges of mixed calibers or gauges in a common container or in your pockets. See your firearm's owner's manual] for more information on the correct ammunition for your firearm.

12. EXAMINE EVERY CARTRIDGE YOU PUT IN YOUR FIREARM.
We assume no responsibility for the use of unsafe or improper firearm and ammunition combinations or damage or injury caused by damaged ammunition. It is your responsibility to read and heed all warnings in this owner’s manual and on ammunition boxes. See [your firearm's owner's manual] for more information on the correct ammunition for your firearm.

13. USE ONLY SAAMI APPROVED AMMUNITION.
The barrel and action of this firearm have been made with safety margins over the pressures established by the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute (SAAMI) for Service Cartridges. However, we assume no responsibility for incidents which occur through the use of cartridges of nonstandard dimension or those developing pressures in excess of SAAMI established standards.

14. DISCHARGING FIREARMS IN POORLY VENTILATED AREAS, CLEANING FIREARMS OR HANDLING AMMUNITION MAY RESULT IN EXPOSURE TO LEAD AND OTHER SUBSTANCES KNOWN TO CAUSE BIRTH DEFECTS, REPRODUCTIVE HARM AND OTHER SERIOUS PHYSICAL INJURY. HAVE ADEQUATE VENTILATION AT ALL TIMES. WASH HANDS THOROUGHLY AFTER EXPOSURE.

15. DO NOT SNAP THE FIRING PIN ON AN EMPTY CHAMBER; THE CHAMBER MAY NOT BE EMPTY!
Treat every firearm with the respect due a loaded firearm, even though you are certain the firearm is unloaded.

16. KEEP YOUR FINGERS AWAY FROM THE TRIGGER WHILE LOADING AND UNLOADING UNTIL SHOOTING IS IMMINENT.

17. BE SURE OF YOUR TARGET AND BACKSTOP, PARTICULARLY DURING LOW LIGHT PERIODS.
Know the range of your ammunition. Never shoot at water or hard objects.

18. ALWAYS UNLOAD YOUR FIREARM’S CHAMBER BEFORE CROSSING A FENCE, CLIMBING A TREE, JUMPING A DITCH OR NEGOTIATING OTHER OBSTACLES.
Never place your firearm on or against a fence, tree, car or other similar object.

19. BE DEFENSIVE AND ON GUARD AGAINST UNSAFE GUN HANDLING AROUND YOU AND OTHERS.
Don’t be timid when it comes to firearms safety. If you observe other shooters violating any of these safety precautions, politely suggest safer handling practices.

20. BE CERTAIN YOUR FIREARM IS UNLOADED BEFORE CLEANING.
Special and extreme care should be taken to be sure your firearm is unloaded before disassembly, cleaning and reassembly. Keep ammunition away from the cleaning location. Never test the mechanical function of any firearm with live ammunition.

21. TEACH AND SUPERVISE FIREARMS SAFETY TO ALL MEMBERS OF YOUR FAMILY, ESPECIALLY TO CHILDREN AND NON-SHOOTERS.
Closely supervise newcomers to the shooting sports. Encourage enrollment in hunting and shooting safety courses.

22. NEVER DRINK ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES OR TAKE ANY TYPE OF DRUGS BEFORE OR DURING SHOOTING.
Your vision, motor skills and judgment could be dangerously impaired, making your gun handling unsafe to you and to others.

23. READ AND HEED ALL WARNINGS IN THIS OWNER’S MANUAL, ON AMMUNITION BOXES AND WITH ALL ACCESSORIES THAT YOU INSTALL ON YOUR FIREARM.
It is your responsibility to secure the most up-to-date information on the safe handling procedures of your Browning firearm. We assume no liability for incidents which occur when unsafe or improper firearm accessories or ammunition combinations are used.

24. PRACTICE PERIODIC MAINTENANCE, AVOID UNAUTHORIZED SERVICING.
Your firearm is a mechanical device which will not last forever, and as such, is subject to wear and requires periodic inspection, adjustment and service. Browning firearms should be serviced by a Browning Recommended Service Center or by our Service Facility in Arnold, Missouri. We assume no responsibility for injuries suffered or caused by unauthorized servicing, alterations or modifications of Browning firearms.

25DO NOT, UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES, ALTER THE TRIGGER, “SAFETY” OR OTHER PARTS OF THE FIRING MECHANISM OF THIS OR ANY OTHER FIREARM EXCEPT AS OTHERWISE DESCRIBED IN THIS MANUAL.
We reserve the right to refuse service on firearms that have been altered, added to or substantially changed. Removal of metal from the barrel, or modifications of the firing mechanism and/or operating parts may lead to a refusal of service on such firearms. You will be charged for parts and labor to return the firearm to original specifications prior to servicing your firearm.

With respect to AFTERMARKET PARTS OR COMPONENTS (including, for example, aftermarket trigger systems, barrels, muzzle brakes, suppressors, magazines, etc.), USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Browning firearms are designed and engineered to meet stringent safety standards. Browning is not responsible for personal injuries or property damage caused by alterations to a firearm. This includes the incorporation of aftermarket parts or components that may or may not satisfy Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute (SAAMI) standards (for example, an aftermarket trigger system may not satisfy SAAMI minimum trigger pull standards, etc.) or may create other dangerous conditions. These conditions may or may not be apparent to the user (for example, installing an aftermarket barrel may have the effect of altering critical firearm dimensions, including headspace, and may create an unsafe firing condition, etc.). Aftermarket parts or components that do not satisfy SAAMI standards, or that could create other dangerous conditions, should not be used.

FAILURE TO FOLLOW THIS WARNING COULD RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH, AS WELL AS CAUSE DAMAGE TO YOUR FIREARM.

BE CAREFUL!

According to state law, California requires that firearm manufacturers, distributors and retailers include conspicuous, specific warnings with firearms sold in that state.

WARNING.

Firearms must be handled responsibly and securely stored to prevent access by children and other unauthorized users.

Model

California has strict laws pertaining to firearms, and you may be fined or imprisoned if you fail to comply with them. Visit the Web site of the California Attorney General at https://oag.ca.gov/firearms for information on firearm laws applicable to you and how you can comply.

Prevent child access by always keeping guns locked away and unloaded when not in use. If you keep a loaded firearm where a child obtains and improperly uses it, you may be fined or sent to prison.

WARNING.

Las armas de fuego deben de ser manipuladas responsablemente y almacenadas en sitios seguros para prevenir el acceso a ellas por parte de niños y personas sin autorización.

California cuenta con leyes estrictas sobre las armas de fuego, y puede ser multado y encarcelado si no las obedece. Visite la página web de California Attorney General, https://oag.ca.gov/firearms para más información sobre cómo cumplir con las leyes de armas de fuego.

Prevenga el acceso de los niños a las armas de fuego manteniéndolas siempre en un lugar seguro, bajo llave y descargadas cuando no estén en uso. Si usted deja un arma cargada al alcance de un niño, y éste la utiliza indebidamente,usted podría ser multado e incluso enviado a la cárcel.

Cooey Model 600 – Old Faithful

Like so many things, my feelings about the Cooey Model 600 are a matter of context. Were I not a Canadian, and were this not a gun that was literally handed down to me from my father, I may not feel that this particular rimfire rifle is the one all Canadians should at some point own. But the fact of the matter is, I am Canadian, this was my dad’s gun and, thus, I believe everyone should own a Cooey.

Herbert William Cooey was the epitome of Canadian spirit. Having traipsed about and generally wasted his youth (as many of us do), he came to Toronto a failed die maker’s apprentice with little to his name, and even less to his credit. But, at the age of 23, he opened a machine shop in Toronto and billed himself as a “mechanical expert and practicing machinist.” Not entirely a lie, he would complete the construction of an automobile of his own design (which boasted the use of a preheated fuel supply and dual exhaust valves) just three years after opening his doors in 1903. Not surprisingly, his ingenuity eventually led to some success and he was contracted to produce firearm parts for the war effort during the First World War.

This led to a natural segue for Herbert and he reinvested much of his wartime profits back into the company by designing and manufacturing his first firearm: the single shot rimfire Cooey Canuck. Years later, after winning an Olympic silver medal for trapshooting, Cooey would create a bolt-action repeater with a tubular magazine and call it the Model 60. Debuting in 1939, the 60 would be replaced by the evolutionary Model 600 in 1967, after the brand was purchased by Winchester.

While my old Model 600 may bear the Winchester brand upon its barrel, it is a Canadian production and, in reality, is almost no different from Cooey’s older Model 60. And as you’d expect from such a gun, it’s excellent. Even after years of use, abuse, and (if we’re honest) neglect, it still shoots incredibly well and competes with newer bolt action rifles such as Richard’s Savage. At 50 yards, with decent ammunition such as CCI Standard Velocity, it’ll outshoot most people and off a rested position it will turn 10 rounds into one ragged hole no larger than a half inch across. Use crappy ammunition, though, and all bets are off.

Cooey Model 600 Owners Manual Transmission

Of course, there have been advances in the years since this gun was made and they are apparent in certain areas. Specifically, the trigger leaves a lot to be desired. It’s pretty terrible, with a ton of creep and a couple of discernibly gritty portions. I’ve grown used to it over the years and can stage it relatively well, but anyone else that picks the gun up always comments on the terrible trigger pull. Then, there’s the loading. The tubular magazine is a complete pain, and the soft wax-coated tips of most .22 ammunition bind up on the follower, so loading it requires the follower be spun as it is slid down into the magazine tube. It’s another quirk of the gun you just need to learn. Oh, and the ejector isn’t the most enthusiastic, so unless you give the bolt a good tug to the rear you’re just asking for the controlled-feed action to bind up.

Some of these issues are intrinsic in the design. A tubular ma gazine with a removable follower will never be as easy to load as a box magazine. And while the incredibly simple trigger certainly could be reworked for a shorter pull, the construction of the trigger doesn’t doesn’t make it well-suited to light pull weights; in short, I wouldn’t trust the gun to remain safe enough to carry afield with any trigger work.

Cooey Model 600 Owners Manual

But with all that said, these are solidly made guns that really don’t have many problems. And, like so many other items manufactured over 50 years ago, they are largely user-serviceable. For example, the extractor that wraps around the bolt head on most Cooeys is made of spring steel and can be easily removed, cleaned, and tweaked as needed. There are no plastic nor metal injection molded parts to break, so there is rarely any need to replace parts outright, and the barrels are quite excellent.

I will freely admit that it would be easy to find a more practical and functional gun, one with with an easy to load magazine and a better trigger. But there’s more to firearms ownership than simply pulling a trigger. Sometimes it’s a matter of taking pride in owning a very real part of our nation’s history, or in this case, a piece of my own family’s history. One of my favourite aspects of the shooting hobby is that it grants us the ability to step back in time and shoot a rifle, pistol, or shotgun that may be over a hundred years old, but performs as well today as it did when it was new. One could quite easily purchase a 60 year old Cooey rifle and have a precisely the same amount of fun with it as one could a brand new rifle.

So whenever I see the old Cooey standing in the gun safe, with that leather sling my dad made for it in his youth hanging from the sling swivel that refuses to tighten up, I think about my own history and know that no matter what, this isn’t just the one rimfire I wouldn’t be without – its’ the one gun I’ll never part with.

Savage Mark 2

When discussing rifles of a Canadian flavour, it is an inevitability that the fantastic rimfires manufactured by Cooey and Lakefield will enter your thoughts. Seemingly back to back in their respective runs, they have been the most significant manufacturers of smallbores in Canada since the early years of the 20th century. Though both operations were bought out some time ago, Lakefield by Savage Arms the former by Winchester, they remain staples of rifle collection – the proverbial first rifle for many Canadian shooters. For us here at Calibre, it is no different. Within our “arsenal” of sorts – because those two firearms alone seem to constitute such according to the media – sits a Cooey Model 600 and a Savage Mk II G. Unsurprisingly, a debate arose between two of Calibre’s staffers. Dan, long-time owner of his Model 600 claims his Cooey is the rifle you should own. Richard, on the other hand, thinks the Savage is the better option. So which is it?

It will come as no surprise that much of what makes the Cooey great will be its sense of nostalgia and great Canadian pedigree – an Olympic pedigree even if one of his rimfires wasn’t used to win Canada a silver medal in trap shooting. I’m sure Dan will base the merits of Cooey largely on such and I don’t intend to disagree. The Canadian essence is undeniable, a trait even I appreciate as much as the next – especially when purchasing a rifle. So why the Savage instead? Well, it’s quite simple and it may or may not surprise you. Other than being a superior rifle, what’s surprising to learn is that, at heart, the story of Savage Arms’ rimfire rifles are as every bit Canadian as Cooey’s.

With humble origins in Utica, Ney York, Savage Arms was established in 1894 and enjoyed a fairly prominent presence in the commercial firearms market for some time, mostly on the merit of their Model 99. Within a few decades, Savage stamps could be found on everything between high-powered rifles down to an array of .22’s. The troubling bit though is this success wasn’t to endure; seeing the company struggling enormously by the mid-sixties and an existence which would continue well in the eighties. By 1988, with the only the Model 110 rifle in production, Savage hit its low point and sought bankruptcy protection under new leadership with an eye for the future. Emphasis was now placed on economic firearms which sought to maximize quality in the manufacturing process with innovations largely seen on rifles at higher price points. Suffice to say, it worked and the company rebounded.

Meanwhile, there was a company in Eastern Ontario called Lakefield Arms which put up shop in 1965. Over a run of 30 years, Lakefield essentially replaced Cooey as the consummate Canadian smallbore rifle with a series of popular semi-automatic and bolt action models. Most noteworthy were the Mk I, Mk II, 64B, and the 90 series of rifles – touted for their solid actions and excellent barrels; a pairing which made them tack drivers with the right ammunition. Despite its humble beginnings, this outfit would grow to become the largest commercial firearms manufacturer in Canada – a trait it maintains today, even if it is no longer known as Lakefield. By the mid-nineties, Savage Arms sought to maintain the momentum of their new found success and diversify its inventory. You might call it a match made in heaven. Or an offer that couldn’t be refused. Whatever the case, Savage purchased Lakefield Arms in the 90’s, re-branding Lakefield to what we know today as Savage Arms Canada.

Cooey Model 600 Owners Manual Transfer Switch

Though rifles with the Lakefield stamp are that of yesteryear, the essence is ever present in the Savage rimfires manufactured today – only better. As is in most things, the natural evolution of anything is toward adaptability and improvement – with the latter being exactly that in Savage‘s rimfires. Unlike the Cooey, which was bought out by Winchester and no longer made under any guise, the rifles made today by Savage are essentially the same ones which Lakefield always have, down to their model names. This is done to the tune of about 185,000 examples each year – each and every one in the same facility, by the same technicians and employees, with the same devotion and pride in the Eastern Ontario town of Lakefield.

The Mk II G sits near the price point bottom of the wide variety of Savage smallbores, which includes a plethora of options for the Mk II alone. As was seen in our rimfire feature in July/August of 2013, the Mk II G possessed the sense of a better built, better finished rifle in comparison to its adversaries. While the Mk II G is devoid of their AccuStock barrel bedding process on its otherwise splendid wooden stock, it does implement another Savage innovation in the AccuTrigger feature. If either sound like gimmicks, rest assured they’re not. In terms of the AccuTrigger, it is a design by Savage that couples with benefits of a light, crisp trigger pull without the sacrifices of safety which can be adjusted to suit personal preference easily enough. Within the trigger is their AccuRelease mechanism which acts to catch the sear unless it is mutually depressed by the shooter in concert with the trigger itself. The end product is a desirable trigger weight without pesky trigger creep – perfect for shooting tight groups with a safety vessel that doesn’t disrupt the shooter. Win, win right?

Further to its superior trigger assembly, another huge benefit of the Savage is its ten round, detachable box magazine. Though these words won’t be mentioned in this publication, you should rest assured that many a profane one was uttered while loading the Cooey’s cumbersome tube mag by yours truly. That said, I may need some convincing on the long term durability of their mags.

Though it would be unfair to compare the action of a new rifle to that of a design old enough to be my grandfather, I will. And by doing so, I offer the opinion that the Savage’s action is smoother and far more consistent in correctly extracting and chambering casings – which isn’t to say I didn’t encounter the odd jam during extraction. Even better for us lefties is the availability of left handed models in the GL. I’ll let you guess what L stands for.

But above all else, to me anyway, is its accuracy. One of the things I really took from it all was its out of the box accuracy. I would even suggest that, despite being $200 cheaper than my CZ 452, it’s probably going to produce groups in my hands that are negligible in size – at least in my humble expectations for success. Undeniably, the CZ is the better rifle – but we’re talking entry-level .22’s and for me, the Savage is the crème de la crème of the lot, even if a new one will cost you about $100 more than the average going price for a used Cooey.

It’s difficult to find fault with the Savage. By comparison, yeah – the quality isn’t that of say my CZ; but at half the price, why would it be? And let’s be clear, it’s not entirely bad either. By fair comparison, it’s as good as or better than anything you’re viable to find from Marlin or Remington in around that price. So while the Savage Mk II G may not share the same silver lining of sorts in its history as does the Cooey, its roots were seeded in Canada long before it was known as a Savage. So in closing i say this: To the fine folks in Lakefield, thank you – keep up the great work.

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