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The first notebook I used full-time was a 1GHz Titanium PowerBook G4, and while I used a bunch of iMac G3s and beige Power Mac G3 in high school, my part-time job at the time came with what I consider to be “my” first Mac — a Blue & White Power Mac G3.

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(That’s my exact machine. I just got it back through an extensive set of trades on the Memphis gray market for old Macs.)

The Blue and White is an interesting machine, beyond my attachment to it.

History

Introduced in January 1999 at Macworld, the “Power Mac G3 (Blue and White)” took the design of the iMac and brought it to the professional desktop world.

Of course, 1999 was a weird time for the company. OS 8 was out, and the cat was out of the bag about OS X, but Aqua was still a year away.

Things, however, were looking up. Apple has sold 1.6 million of the out-going beige machine. The new machines, however were designed to be faster, more expandable and better designed.

The processors in the Blue and White were fast (and copper!), the machine had lots of expansion bays, but the inclusion of an ATI Rage 128 video cards and FireWire set the machine apart.

Lastly, the Blue and White was the first Mac to ship with FireWire, leaving behind SCSI forever.

Hardware & Software

More so than the iMac G3, the Blue and White is a transition model. It was the debut machine for FireWire, and brought USB to Apple’s professional lineup. To the chagrin of pro users, however, the company dropped the serial ports, floppy drive and SCSI support found on the out-going machine. This computer also holds the distinction to be the only Mac to ship with both ADB and FireWire.

Most importantly, it was the first Power Mac to ship with the New World ROM.

Inside, the Blue and Whites were packed full of fairly standard parts. Drives connected over IDE, the RAM came in generic modules, and the processor sat on a ZIF socket. With 4 PCI slots, the Blue and White could easily be customized for video and audio work, connecting serial-powered devices and more. The “Gossamer” logic board was based on the beige G3 before it.

Revision A machines, however, had some issues. Here’s a section from the machine’s Wikipedia page:

Early blue and white G3s (“Revision 1” units) had IDE controller problems related to the ATA/33 hard drive controller that made it impossible to connect two hard drives and prevented the use of newer drives. Using newer ATA drives in those units resulted in data transmission errors if the drives were connected to the on-board ATA/33 controller, the severity of the problem varying according to the particular make and model of the drive. Workarounds include replacing motherboards and employing the use of SCSI, Ultra ATA or SATA PCI controller cards. Stable operation can be achieved if the drive can be limited to Multi-Word DMA Mode 2 (disabling UDMA), although this limits throughput to 16 MB/sec. Some hard drives support disabling UDMA in firmware through manufacturer-supplied utilities (generally DOS-based). Alternatively, the transfer mode can be limited to Multi-Word DMA Mode 2 through the use of third-party driver software such as FWB Hard Disk Toolkit.

In late April 1999, the line was speed-bumped by 50 MHz, bringing the high-end model to 450 MHz. These “Revision B” machines shipped with a revised logic board and didn’t experience the nasty IDE controller issues.

(Thankfully, mine’s a 400 MHz Rev. B.)

The 350, 400 and 450 MHz models from the Rev. B series shipped with the same logic board — dubbed “Yikes” that would end up in the first Power Mac G4 machines.

The Blue and White was a huge upgrade in terms of looks. Just look at the previous G3 tower:

The new case was codenamed El Capitan. Its feet and handles were easy to grip, making moving the G3 easier than ever. The front, back and top were bold, showing off the Bondi Blue plastic in a much brighter way than the iMac, and the translucent side panels were enough to make any beige box look dingy.

All of the internals were easy to get to, thanks to the handle and drop-down side:

Here’s Steve Jobs showing off the case for the first time. Don’t miss the “Design is how it works” line.

The opening door was a revolution, and Apple liked showing it off. Compared to the closed and heavily customized Macs of today, the Blue and White seems almost foreign.

The Blue and White isn’t the first Mac that was easy to open, but compared something like the Power Macintosh G3 (Desktop) that preceded it, it’s elegant:


Beyond the functionality, the Blue and White was downright beautiful.

Sometimes, a machine comes along that sets the tone for years to come. Until the 2013 Mac Pro, the G3’s bones remained in place. Just check out the 2002-2004 “Mirror Drive Door” Power Mac G4:

While the Power Mac G5 and Mac Pro ditched the fold-down side, the machines’ shared case design retained the easy-to-reach internals and handles:

Software wise, the Blue and White has one of the widest ranges of any machine.

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Revision A machines came with Mac OS 8.5.1 and Rev. B shipped with 8.6, but all Blue and Whites are capable of running OS X Tiger, thanks to the 1 GB RAM ceiling and FireWire ports.

Beyond its impressive client reach, the Blue and White is important in Apple’s server history, as Steve Jobs used one to demo Mac OS X Server 1.0 for the first time.

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The Blue and White gave Apple the power it needed to run the smash up of NeXTSTEP and Mac OS 8. In what may be one my favorite demos ever, Steve Jobs booted a rack of 49 hard drive-less iMacs from a single Power Mac G3.

As future-thinking as it was, except for the most basic of tasks, the G3-powered Blue and White is past its useful lives. Even with overclocking, this machine’s just run out of steam.

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Conclusion

In many ways, the Blue and White set the tone for modern Mac towers. Its easy-access door would remain a staple for 14 years, and its inclusion of things like FireWire and Ultra-ATA brought the Power Macintosh into the 21st-century. It holds a special place in the Apple history books, and an important place in my collection.

(Redirected from Power Mac G4 Graphite)
Power Mac G4
DeveloperApple Computer, Inc.
TypeMini Tower
Release dateAugust 31, 1999
DiscontinuedJune 20, 2004
CPUsingle or dual PowerPC G4,
350 MHz – 1.42 GHz (Up to 2 GHz processors through 3rd-party upgrades.)
PredecessorPower Macintosh G3
SuccessorPower Mac G5

The Power Mac G4 is a series of personal computers designed, manufactured, and sold by Apple Computer, Inc. from 1999 to 2004 as part of the Power Macintosh line. Built around the PowerPC G4 series of microprocessors, the Power Mac G4 was marketed by Apple as the first 'personal supercomputers',[1] reaching speeds of 4 to 20 gigaFLOPS. This was the first existing Macintosh product to be officially shortened as 'Mac', and is the last Mac able to boot into classic Mac OS.

The enclosure style introduced with the Power Macintosh G3 (Blue and White) was retained through the entire five-year production run of the Power Mac G4, albeit with significant changes to match Apple's evolving industrial design and to accommodate increasing cooling needs. The G4 and its enclosure were retired with the introduction of the Power Mac G5.

PCI Graphics/AGP Graphics/Gigabit Ethernet[edit]

'Graphite' Power Mac G4
Rear view of a 'Graphite' Power Mac G4, showing the available ports

The original Power Mac G4 was introduced at the Seybold conference in San Francisco on August 31, 1999.[2] There were two variants, officially titled Power Mac G4 (AGP Graphics) with 400 MHz, 450 MHz and 500 MHz configurations available, and Power Mac G4 (PCI Graphics), with 350 MHz and 400 MHz configurations. Colloquially, this generation of Power Mac is referred to as 'Graphite', owing to the colors of the case being similar to the iMac G3 Graphite.

Apple originally planned to ship the 500 MHz configuration in October 1999, but they were forced to postpone this because of poor yield of the CPUs. In response, Apple reduced the clock speed of the processor in each configuration by 50 MHz (making the options 350 MHz, 400 MHz and 450 MHz), which caused some controversy because they did not lower the original prices accordingly.[3]

The early 400 MHz (later 350 MHz) PCI-based version used a motherboard identical to the one used in Power Macintosh G3 (Blue and White) computers including the use of Zero Insertion Force (ZIF) processors sockets[4] (minus the ADB port), in a 'graphite' colored case and with the new MotorolaPowerPC 7400 (G4) CPU. The higher-speed models, code name 'Sawtooth', used a greatly modified motherboard design with AGP 2x graphics (replacing the 66 MHz PCI slot).

The PCI variant was discontinued at the end of 1999.[5]

The machines featured DVD-ROM drives as standard. The 400 MHz and 450 MHz versions had 100 MBZip drives as standard equipment, and as an option on the 350 MHz Sawtooth. This series had a 100 MHzsystem bus and four PC100SDRAM slots for up to 2 GB of RAM (1.5 GB under Mac OS 9). The AGP Power Macs were the first to include an AirPort slot and DVI video port. The computers could house a total of three hard drives, two 128 GB ATA hard drives and up to a single 20GB SCSI hard drive, with the installation of a SCSI card.

The 500 MHz version was reintroduced on February 16, 2000, accompanied by 400 MHz and 450 MHz models. DVD-RAM and Zip drives featured on these later 450 MHz and 500 MHz versions and were an option on the 400 MHz.

The Power Mac G4 (Gigabit Ethernet) model was introduced at Macworld ExpoNew York on July 19, 2000; the new revision included dual-processor 450 MHz and 500 MHz versions, and a low-end single CPU 400 MHz model. It was also the first personal computer to include gigabit Ethernet as standard. Most people saw this revision as a stopgap release, because higher clocked G4s were not available; the G4’s Motorola XPC107 “Grackle” PCI/Memory controller prevented the G4 from hitting speeds higher than 500 MHz.[citation needed] The dual 500 MHz models featured DVD-RAM optical drives. Zip drives were optional on all models. These models also introduced Apple's proprietary Apple Display Connector video port.

ComponentPower Mac G4 (PCI Graphics)Power Mac G4 (AGP Graphics)Power Mac G4 (Gigabit Ethernet)
Codename'Yikes!''Sawtooth, P5, Project E''Mystic, Medusa2, SnakeBite'
Color
Model identifierPowerMac1,2PowerMac3,1PowerMac3,3
Processor350 or 400 MHz PowerPC G4 (7400)350, 400, 450 or 500 MHz PowerPC G4 (7400)400, Dual 450 or Dual 500 MHz PowerPC G4 (7400)
CPU cache64 KB L1, 512 KB or 1 MB backside L2 Cache per CPU (1:2)
Front side bus100 MHz
Memory64, 128, 256, 512 MB, or 1GB PC100 SDRAM
Expandable to 1 GB
64, 128, 256, 512 MB, 1 or 2GB PC100 SDRAM
Expandable to 2 GB. Only 1.5 GB is seen in Mac OS 9
Graphics cardATI Rage 128 with 16 MB of VRAM
66 MHz PCI Slot
ATI Rage 128 or ATI Rage 128 Pro with 16 MB of VRAM
AGP 2x
ATI Rage 128 Pro with 16 MB VRAM or ATI Radeon with 32 MB of VRAM
AGP 2x w/ADC Monitor support
Hard drive10 GB ATA
Up to 128 GB
10, 20, or 27 GB 7200-rpm ATA
18 or 36 GB 10K-rpm SCSI
Up to 128 GB (10.4.11 and newer support hard drives larger than 128 GB with special software)
20 GB 5400-rpm, 30 or 40 GB 7200-rpm ATA
36 or 72 GB 10K-rpm SCSI
Up to 128 GB (10.4.11 and newer support Hard Drives larger than 128 GB with special software)
Ultra ATA/33Ultra ATA/66 (Optional Ultra2 LVD SCSI)
Optical drive32× CD-ROM or DVD-ROM32× CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, or DVD-RAMDVD-ROM or DVD-RAM
Connectivity10/100BASE-T Ethernet
56k modem
Optional AirPort 802.11b
10/100BASE-T Ethernet
56k modem
Optional AirPort 802.11b
Gigabit Ethernet
56k V.90 modem
Expansion1× Zip drive bay (optional Zip drive)
3x 64bit 33 MHz PCI slots
1× 66 MHz PCI slot (dedicated to video)
1× Zip drive bay (optional Zip drive)
3x 64-bit 33 MHz PCI slots
1× 2× AGP slot (dedicated to video)
Peripherals2× USB 1.1
2× FireWire 400
Built-in mono speaker
Audio input mini-jack
Audio output mini-jack
2× USB 1.1
2× FireWire 400
1× Internal FireWire 400
Built-in mono speaker
Audio input mini-jack
Audio output mini-jack
2× USB 1.1
2× FireWire 400
Built-in mono speaker
Audio input mini-jack
Audio output mini-jack
Maximum Operating SystemMac OS X 10.4.11 'Tiger' and Mac OS 9.2.2Mac OS X 10.4.11 'Tiger' and Mac OS 9.2.2
Unofficially can support 10.5 Leopard via 3rd party software
Weight13 kg (28.7 pounds)13.6 kg (30 pounds)13.6 kg (30 pounds)

Digital Audio/Quicksilver[edit]

Power Mac G4 (Quicksilver)

A new line with a revamped motherboard but retaining the familiar 'Graphite' case debuted on January 9, 2001. Known officially as the Power Mac G4 (Digital Audio), it is in effect a Quicksilver design inside the Graphite enclosure. Motorola had added a seventh pipeline stage in the new PowerPC G4 design to achieve faster clock frequencies. New features included a fourth PCI slot, a 133 MHz system bus, an improved 4X AGP slot, and a new 'digital audio' Tripath Class T amplifier sound system. The models were offered in 466 MHz, 533 MHz, dual 533 MHz, 667 MHz and 733 MHz configurations, the latter two using a newer PowerPC 7450 processor. The number of RAM slots was reduced to three, accommodating up to 1.5 Gigabytes of PC133SDRAM.

The 733 MHzPnp audio device driver xp download. model was the first Macintosh to include a built-in DVD-R or Apple-branded SuperDrive, the rest of the line became the first Macs to ship with CD-RW drives. This was also the first series of Macs to include an Nvidia graphics card, the GeForce 2MX.

At Macworld ExpoNew York on July 18, 2001, a new line debuted featuring a cosmetically redesigned case known as Quicksilver, and various upgrades to the specifications. It was available in 733 MHz, 867 MHz and dual 800 MHz configurations. The 733 MHz model was notable for not having a level three cache. The SuperDrive was offered on the mid-range 867 MHz model, and UltraATA/100 hard drives were offered on all models. The internal speaker received an upgrade, using a Harman/Kardon speaker.

The Quicksilver line received criticism in MacWorld's review for removing the 'eject' button and the manual eject pinhole, as well as the pass-through monitor power plug, and for the base specification of 128 MB RAM as being insufficient for running Mac OS X.[6]

Updated Quicksilver machines, officially named Power Mac G4 (QuickSilver 2002), were introduced on January 28, 2002, with 800 MHz, 933 MHz and dual 1 GHz configurations. This was the first Mac to reach 1 GHz. Again, the low-end 800 MHz model did not include any level three cache. The graphics in this series were provided by an Nvidia GeForce4 MX400 card. Some of these models have ATA controllers with 48-bit LBA to accommodate hard drives larger than 128 GB.

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ComponentPower Mac G4 (Digital Audio)Power Mac G4 (Quicksilver)Power Mac G4 (Quicksilver 2002)Power Mac G4 (Quicksilver 2002ED)
Codename'Tangent, Clockwork''Titan, Nichrome'N/AN/A
Model identifierPowerMac3,4PowerMac3,5
Processor466, 533, Dual 533, 667, or 733 MHz PowerPC G4 (7400/7410/7450)733, 867, or Dual 800 MHz PowerPC G4 (7450)733 (education only), 800, 933 MHz, or Dual 1 GHz PowerPC G4 (7450/7455)867 MHz PowerPC G4 (7455)
CPU cache64 KB L1, 256 KB (1:1) or 1 MB (1:2) L2, 1 MB L3 (733 MHz)64 KB L1, 256 KB (1:1) L2, 2 MB L3 (867/Dual 800 MHz)64 KB L1, 256 KB (1:1) L2, 2 MB DDR L3 (933/Dual 1 GHz)64 KB L1, 256 KB (1:1) L2
Front side bus133 MHz
Memory128, 256, or 512 MB PC133 SDRAM
Expandable to 1.5 GB
GraphicsATI Rage 128 Pro with 16 MB VRAM, ATI Radeon or Nvidia GeForce2 MX with 32 MB VRAM, GeForce3 with 64 MB VRAMNvidia GeForce2 MX with 32 MB VRAM, Geforce2 MX with TwinView or Geforce3 with 64 MB VRAMATI Radeon 7500 with 32 MB VRAM, Nvidia GeForce4 MX with 64 MB VRAM or GeForce4 Ti with 128 MB VRAMNvidia GeForce4 MX with 32 MB VRAM
Hard drive30 GB 5400-rpm, 40 or 60 GB 7200-rpm ATA
36 or 72 GB SCSI
Up to 128 GB
40 GB 5400-rpm, 60 or 80 GB 7200-rpm ATA
36 or 72 GB SCSI
Up to 128 GB
40, 60, or 80 GB 7200-rpm ATA
36 or 72 GB SCSI
Supports Hard Drives larger than 128 GB
40 GB 7200-rpm
Supports Hard Drives larger than 128 GB
Ultra ATA/66 (Optional Ultra SCSI or Ultra 160 SCSI)
Optical driveCD-RW or DVD-ROM or DVD-R/CD-RW SuperDrive (on 733 MHz model only)CD-RW
or CD-RW/DVD-ROM Combo Drive
or DVD-R/CD-RW SuperDrive (867 and dual-800 models only)
CD-RW
ConnectivityOptional AirPort 802.11b
GigabitEthernet
56k V.90 modem
Expansion1x Zip Drive bay (Optional 250 MB Zip Drive)
4x 64-bit 33 MHz PCI slots
1x 4x AGP slot (dedicated to video)
Peripherals2x USB 1.1
2x Firewire 400
Built-in mono speaker
Audio output mini-jack
Apple Pro Speakers mini-jack
Maximum Operating SystemMac OS X 10.4.11 'Tiger' and Mac OS 9.2.2Mac OS X 10.4.11 “Tiger” and Mac OS 9.2.2 (733 and Dual 800 MHz)Mac OS X 10.4.11 “Tiger” and Mac OS 9.2.2 (733 and 800 MHz)Mac OS X 10.5.8 'Leopard'
Mac OS X 10.5.8 “Leopard” (867 MHz)Mac OS X 10.5.8 “Leopard” (933 MHz and Dual 1 GHz)
Weight13.6 kg (30 Pounds)

Mirrored Drive Doors/FW800[edit]

Power Mac G4 (Mirrored Drive Doors)
Power Mac G4 MDD with open case

Another generation of Apple Power Mac G4s, officially named 'Mirrored Drive Doors' (MDD), was introduced on August 13, 2002, featuring both a new Xserve-derived DDR motherboard architecture and a new case design. All models were available in dual processor configurations running at 867 MHz, 1 GHz or 1.25 GHz. As with the Xserves, the PowerPC 7455 CPU used does not have a DDR frontside bus, meaning the CPU of the 133MHz frontside bus models could use at most only 50% of the new system's theoretical memory bandwidth, providing no improvement over previous models. The rest was available to the graphics card and I/O systems. A single processor 1.25 GHz model would be the last Power Mac G4 the company offered to the public after the announcement of the new Power Mac G5, introduced in June 2003.

The last real update to the Power Mac G4 line came on January 28, 2003, offering dual 1.42 GHz PowerPC 7455 processors, with features not seen in previous DDR models: a built-in FireWire 800 connector, optional integrated Bluetooth, and optional integrated AirPort Extreme. These were also the first Power Macs that could not boot into Mac OS 9.

Power Mac Service Center

With the launch of the Power Mac G5 on June 23, 2003, Apple re-introduced the August 2002 Power Mac G4 because of perceived demand for Mac OS 9 machines. Between that, its low price-tag, and the delayed availability of Power Mac G5s, it proved a strong seller, albeit for a relatively short time. Production stopped on June 27, 2004, and the remaining inventory was liquidated, its discontinuation ending the 20-year legacy of Classic Mac OS support.


ComponentPower Mac G4 (Mirrored Drive Doors)Power Mac G4 (Mirrored Drive Doors FW800)Power Mac G4 (Mirrored Drive Doors 2003)
Codename'P57''P58'”P59”
Model identifierPowerMac3,6
Model Number (Order Number)M8570 (M8787LL/A, M8689LL/A, M8573LL/A)M8570 (M8839LL/A, M8840LL/A, M8841LL/A)M8570 (M9145LL/A), M9309

(M9145LL/A) is a re-released version of (M8573LL/A)

ProcessorDual 867 MHz, Dual 1 GHz, or Dual 1.25 GHz PowerPC G4 (7455)1 GHz, Dual 1.25 GHz or Dual 1.42 GHz PowerPC G4 (7455)1.25 GHz or Dual 1.25 GHz PowerPC G4 (7455)
CPU cache64 KB L1, 256 KB L2, 1 MB or 2 MB DDR L3
Front side bus133 MHz (867 MHz DP)133 MHz (1 GHz)167 MHz
167 MHz (1 GHz DP+)167 MHz (1.25 GHz DP+)
Memory256, 512 MB PC-2100 (Dual 867 MHz), or PC-2700 (Dual 1+ GHz) DDR SDRAM
Expandable to 2 GB (4 x 512 MB PC-3200 DDR SDRAM)
256, 512 MB PC-2100 (1 GHz), or PC-2700 (Dual 1.25+ GHz) DDR SDRAM
Expandable to 2 GB (4 x 512 MB PC-3200 DDR SDRAM)
256, 512 MB PC-2700 DDR SDRAM
Expandable to 2 GB (4 x 512 MB PC-3200 DDR SDRAM)
Graphics CardNvidia GeForce4 MX with 32 MB VRAM, ATI Radeon 9000 Pro with 64 MB VRAM, or GeForce4 Ti with 128 MB VRAM
Upgradeable to Nvidia GeForce 7800 GS with 256 MB VRAM (last GPU supported)
Nvidia GeForce4 MX or ATI Radeon 9000 Pro with 64 MB VRAM, GeForce4 Ti or Radeon 9700 Pro with 128 MB VRAM
Upgradeable to Nvidia GeForce 7800 GS with 256 MB VRAM (last GPU supported)
ATI Radeon 9000 Pro with 64 MB VRAM or Nvidia GeForce4 Ti 128 MB
Upgradeable to Nvidia GeForce 7800 GS with 256 MB VRAM (last GPU supported)
Hard drive60, 80, or 120 GB 7200-rpm ATA
36 or 72 GB Ultra 160 SCSI
Supports Hard Drives larger than 128 GB
60, 80, or 120 GB 7200-rpm ATA
Supports Hard Drives larger than 128 GB
80 or 160 GB 7200-rpm ATA
Supports Hard Drives larger than 128 GB
Ultra ATA/133 (2) and Ultra ATA/66 (2) (Optional Ultra SCSI or Ultra 160 SCSI)Ultra ATA/133 (2) and Ultra ATA/66 (2) (Optional Ultra SCSI)Ultra ATA/133 (2) and Ultra ATA/66 (2)
Optical driveCD-RW/DVD-ROM Combo Drive
or DVD-R/CD-RW SuperDrive
(Optional additional Combo Drive)
ConnectivityOptional AirPort 802.11b
GigabitEthernet
56k V.92 modem
Optional AirPort Extreme 802.11b/g
Gigabit Ethernet
56k V.92 modem
Optional Bluetooth 1.1
Optional Airport 802.11b
Gigabit Ethernet
56k V.92 modem
Peripherals2x USB 1.1
2x Firewire 400
Built-in mono speaker
Audio input mini-jack
Audio output mini-jack
Apple Pro Speakers mini-jack
2x USB 1.1
2x Firewire 400
1x Firewire 800
Built-in mono speaker
Audio input mini-jack
Audio output mini-jack
Apple Pro Speakers mini-jack
2x USB 1.1
2x Firewire 400
Built-in mono speaker
Audio input mini-jack
Audio output mini-jack
Apple Pro Speakers mini-jack
Expansion4x 64-bit 66 MHz PCI slots (5V only)
1x 4x 133 MHz AGP slot (dedicated to video)
Maximum Operating SystemMac OS X 10.5.8 'Leopard'
Mac OS 9.2.2 supported natively and Mac OS 9.1 or higher in the Classic EnvironmentMac OS 9.1 or higher supported solely in the Classic EnvironmentMac OS 9.2.2 supported natively and Mac OS 9.1 or higher in the Classic Environment(final model to support Classic Mac OS natively)
Weight19.1 kg (42 lbs)

Timeline of Power Macintosh models


See also[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Power Mac G4.

Notes[edit]

G Power Mac

  1. ^'Apple Unveils 'Personal Supercomputer''. SFGate.
  2. ^'Apple steps up to G4 Macs'. ZDNet.
  3. ^'The 400 MHz PowerMac Reviewed'. The Mac Observer. February 21, 2000. Retrieved October 19, 2008.
  4. ^'The Apple Power Macintosh G4 400MHz PCI'. Forevermac.com. Retrieved November 30, 2011.
  5. ^'Power Mac G4 (PCI Graphics) - Technical Specifications'.
  6. ^'Hands on with the Power Mac G4/867'. MacWorld. August 25, 2001.
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