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This article describes how to change the Volume Licensing product key.

Original product version: Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows 10 - all editions
Original KB number: 328874

Introduction

Warning

The steps in the article are effective only on Volume License media. If you try these steps on OEM media or on retail media, you will not change the product key.

When you install Windows XP or Windows Server 2003, the media must match the product key. That is, the channel (MSDN, retail, OEM, Volume License, and so on), the SKU (Windows XP Professional, Windows XP Home Edition, and so on), and the language (English, French, and so on) must match between the product key and the media. It is necessary so that you can successfully enter the product key. If the installation media does not match the product key, you receive the following error message:

Product Key is invalid.

If you use a 'leaked' product key (a product key that is known to be available to the public) to deploy Windows XP across multiple computers (a Volume Licensing installation), you might be unable to install Windows XP Service Pack 1 (SP1) and later versions of Windows XP, or automatically obtain updates from the Windows Update Web site. For example, you might receive the following error message when you install Windows XP SP1 and later versions of Windows XP:

The Product Key used to install Windows is invalid. Please contact your system administrator or retailer immediately to obtain a valid Product Key. You may also contact Microsoft Corporation's Anti-Piracy Team by emailing [email protected] if you think you have purchased pirated Microsoft software. Please be assured that any personal information you send to the Microsoft Anti-Piracy Team will be kept in strict confidence.

This article is intended for an advanced computer user. You might find it easier to follow the steps if you print this article first.

More information

Prerequisites

You must have a valid product key before you can use the information in this article. To obtain a valid product key, click the following link to contact the Microsoft Volume Licensing Service Center:
https://www.microsoft.com/licensing/servicecenter/home.aspx

Steps to change the volume licensing product key

This article describes two methods for how to change the Windows XP product key after a Volume Licensing installation to resolve the issue. One method uses the Windows Activation Wizard graphical user interface (GUI) and the other method uses a Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) script. The Activation Wizard method is easier. However, if you must change the product key for multiple computers, the script method is more suitable.

Method 1: Use the Activation Wizard

Important

This section, method, or task contains steps that tell you how to modify the registry. However, serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly. Therefore, make sure that you follow these steps carefully. For added protection, back up the registry before you modify it. Then, you can restore the registry if a problem occurs. For more information about how to back up and restore the registry, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
322756 How to back up and restore the registry in Windows
If you only have a few volume licensing product keys to change, you can use the Activation Wizard.

Note

We recommend that you run System Restore to create a new restore point before you follow these steps.

Deactivate Windows
  1. Click Start, and then click Run.

  2. In the Open box, type regedit, and then click OK.

  3. In the navigation pane, locate and then click the following registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESoftwareMicrosoftWindowsNTCurrent VersionWPAEvents

  4. In the topic pane, right-click OOBETimer, and then click Modify.

  5. Change at least one digit of this value to deactivate Windows.

Reactivate Windows and add new product key
  1. Click Start, and then click Run.

  2. In the Open box, type the following command, and then click OK.
    %systemroot%system32oobemsoobe.exe /a

  3. Click Yes, I want to telephone a customer service representative to activate Windows, and then click Next.

  4. Click Change Product key.

  5. Type the new product key in the New key boxes, and then click Update.

    If you are returned to the previous window, click Remind me later, and then restart the computer.

  6. Repeat steps 1 and 2 to verify that Windows is activated. You receive the following message: Windows is already activated. Click OK to exit.

  7. Click OK.

  8. Install Windows XP Service Pack 1a or a later version of Windows XP.

If you cannot restart Windows after you install Windows XP SP1 or a later version of Windows XP, try the following steps:

  1. Restart your computer and start pressing F8 until you see the Windows Advanced Options menu.
  2. Select Last Known Good Configuration from the menu and press ENTER. This option starts Windows by using a previous good configuration.
  3. Repeat steps 1 through 8 under 'Reactivate Windows and add new product key.'

If you can install SP1 or a later version of Windows XP and you can restart Windows, you have resolved the issue. If the issue has not been resolved, try method 2 or see the 'Next Steps' section for more troubleshooting resources.

Method 2: Use a script

If you must change the product key for multiple computers, we recommend this method. You can create a WMI script that changes the volume licensing product key, and then deploy this script in a startup script.

Volume Control Windows 10

The sample ChangeVLKey2600.vbs script and the sample ChangeVLKeySP1 script that are described in this section use the new volume licensing key that you want to enter as a single argument. It is in a five-part alphanumeric form.

We recommend that you use the ChangeVLKey2600.vbs script on Windows XP-based computers that are not running Windows XP SP1 and later versions of Windows XP and that you use the ChangeVLKeySP1.vbs script on Windows XP-based computers that are running Windows XP SP1 and later versions of Windows XP. These scripts perform the following functions:

  • They remove the hyphen characters (-) from the five-part alphanumeric product key.
  • They create an instance of the win32_WindowsProductActivation class.
  • They call the SetProductKey method with the new volume licensing product key. You can create a batch file or a cmd file that uses either of the following sample scripts, together with the new product key as an argument.

You can deploy it as part of a startup script or run it from the command line to change the product key on a single computer.

Examples

For more information about how to script the product key, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
https://technet.microsoft.com/library/bb457096.aspx

ChangeVLKeySP1.vbs
ChangeVLKey2600.vbs
Volume

The following example shows how to use the ChangeVLKeySP1.vbs script from a command line:

  1. Click Start, and then click Run.
  2. In the Open box, type the following command, where AB123-123AB-AB123-123AB-AB123 is the new product key that you want to use, and then click OK:
    c:changevlkeysp1.vbs ab123-123ab-ab123-123ab-ab123

Set Volume Controls Windows 10

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The ISimpleAudioVolume, IChannelAudioVolume, and IAudioStreamVolume interfaces enable clients to control the volume levels of audio sessions, which are collections of shared-mode audio streams. These interfaces do not work with exclusive-mode audio streams.

Applications that manage exclusive-mode streams can control the volume levels of those streams through the IAudioEndpointVolume interface. This interface controls the volume level of the audio endpoint device. It uses the hardware volume control for the endpoint device if the audio hardware implements such a control. Otherwise, the IAudioEndpointVolume interface implements the volume control in software.

If a device has a hardware volume control, changes made to the control through the IAudioEndpointVolume interface affect the volume level both in shared mode and in exclusive mode. If a device lacks hardware volume and mute controls, changes made to the software volume and mute controls through this interface affect the volume level in shared mode, but not in exclusive mode. In exclusive mode, the application and the audio hardware exchange audio data directly, bypassing the software controls.

As a general rule, applications should avoid using the IAudioEndpointVolume interface to control the volume levels of shared-mode streams. Instead, applications should use the ISimpleAudioVolume, IChannelAudioVolume, or IAudioStreamVolume interface for that purpose.

If an application displays a volume control that uses the IAudioEndpointVolume interface to control the volume level of an audio endpoint device, that volume control should mirror the endpoint volume control displayed by the system volume-control program, Sndvol. As explained previously, the endpoint volume control appears on the left side of the Sndvol window, in the group box labeled Device. If the user changes the endpoint volume of a device through the volume control in Sndvol, the corresponding endpoint volume control in the application should move in unison with the control in Sndvol. Similarly, if the user changes the volume level through the endpoint volume control in the application window, the corresponding volume control in Sndvol should move in unison with the application's volume control.

To ensure that the endpoint volume control in an application window mirrors the endpoint volume control in Sndvol, the application should implement an IAudioEndpointVolumeCallback interface and register that interface to receive notifications. Thereafter, each time the user changes the endpoint volume level in Sndvol, the application receives a notification call through its IAudioEndpointVolumeCallback::OnNotify method. During this call, the OnNotify method can update the endpoint volume control in the application window to match the control setting shown in Sndvol. Similarly, each time the user changes the endpoint volume level through volume control in the application window, Sndvol receives a notification and immediately updates its endpoint volume control to display the new volume level.

The following code example is a header file that shows a possible implementation of the IAudioEndpointVolumeCallback interface:

The CAudioEndpointVolumeCallback class in the preceding code example is an implementation of the IAudioEndpointVolumeCallback interface. Because IAudioEndpointVolumeCallback inherits from IUnknown, the class definition contains implementations of the IUnknown methods AddRef, Release, and QueryInterface. The OnNotify method in the class definition is called each time one of the following methods changes the endpoint volume level:

Cfia automated shipment inspection status search tool. The implementation of the OnNotify method in the preceding code example sends messages to the volume control in the application window to update the displayed volume level.

An application calls the IAudioEndpointVolume::RegisterControlChangeNotify method to register its IAudioEndpointVolumeCallback interface to receive notifications. When the application no longer requires notifications, it calls the IAudioEndpointVolume::UnregisterControlChangeNotify method to delete the registration.

The following code example is a Windows application that calls the RegisterControlChangeNotify and UnregisterControlChangeNotify methods to register and unregister the CAudioEndpointVolumeCallback class in the preceding code example:

In the preceding code example, the WinMain function calls the CoCreateInstance function to create an instance of the IMMDeviceEnumerator interface, and it calls the IMMDeviceEnumerator::GetDefaultAudioEndpoint method to obtain the IMMDevice interface of the default rendering device. WinMain calls the IMMDevice::Activate method to obtain the device's IAudioEndpointVolume interface, and it calls RegisterControlChangeNotify to register the application to receive notifications of endpoint volume changes. Next, WinMain opens a dialog box to display an endpoint volume control for the device. The dialog box also displays a check box that indicates whether the device is muted. The endpoint volume control and mute check box in the dialog box mirror the settings of the endpoint volume control and mute check box displayed by Sndvol. For more information about WinMain and CoCreateInstance, see the Windows SDK documentation. For more information about IMMDeviceEnumerator and IMMDevice, see Enumerating Audio Devices.

The dialog box procedure, DlgProc, in the preceding code example, handles the changes that the user makes to the volume and mute settings through the controls in the dialog box. When DlgProc calls SetMasterVolumeLevelScalar or SetMute, Sndvol receives notification of the change and updates the corresponding control in its window to reflect the new volume or mute setting. If, instead of using the dialog box, the user updates the volume and mute settings through the controls in the Sndvol window, the OnNotify method in the CAudioEndpointVolumeCallback class updates the controls in the dialog box to display the new settings.

If the user changes the volume through the controls in the dialog box, the OnNotify method in the CAudioEndpointVolumeCallback class does not send messages to update the controls in the dialog box. To do so would be redundant. OnNotify updates the controls in the dialog box only if the volume change originated in Sndvol or in some other application. The second parameter in the SetMasterVolumeLevelScalar and SetMute method calls in the DlgProc function is a pointer to an event-context GUID that either method passes to OnNotify. OnNotify checks the value of the event-context GUID to determine whether the dialog box is the source of the volume change. For more information about event-context GUIDs, see IAudioEndpointVolumeCallback::OnNotify.

When the user exits the dialog box, the UnregisterControlChangeNotify call in the preceding code example deletes the registration of the CAudioEndpointVolumeCallback class before the program terminates.

You can easily modify the preceding code example to display volume and mute controls for the default capture device. In the WinMain function, change the value of the first parameter in the call to the IMMDeviceEnumerator::GetDefaultAudioEndpoint method from eRender to eCapture.

The following code example is the resource script that defines the volume and mute controls that appear in the preceding code example:

The following code example is the resource header file that defines the control identifiers that appear in the preceding code examples:

The preceding code examples combine to form a simple application for controlling and monitoring the endpoint volume of the default rendering device. A more useful application might additionally notify the user when the status of the device changes. For example, the device might be disabled, unplugged, or removed. For more information about monitoring these types of events, see Device Events.

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