Pardon Our French...

Pardon Our French: French Stereotypes in American Media Lauren Ferber Faculty Sponsor: Dr. John Davies Abstract According to the mental models approach to media effects, Americans with no French contact are more likely to believe media display a more accurate picture of the French culture than in reality. Thus, today, we have this idiomatic expression “Please pardon my French” incorporated into our English vocabulary as an apology for using obscene language.You can like us on facebook, join us on twitter or read and contribute to our blog: www.pleasepardonourfrench.com C’est la vie. “Please pardon my French” may have originated from the constant warfare between England and France. Beginning as early as the Norman Conquest in 1066, the French were looked down upon while also pissing the English off. By 1337 when the two countries began the Hundred Years War, the English opinion of the French was pretty low. Known in French as “Endives Au Jambon”, this Belgian Endive and Ham Gratin is a typical dish from Northern France and Belgium. Endives are wrapped in ham slices, smothered in a thick layer of voluptuous Mornay Sauce and baked until bubbly perfection. La caravane publicitaire. Before the Tour de France riders roll through the course, there is the massive parade of sponsors. It’s a pretty huge deal - and was a lot more what our kids thought a parade should be (especially compared with some recently disappointing events) There were floats, lots of music, and tonnes of people throwing out (often rather violently) freebies.

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Pardon our french

Pardon Our French Blog

“Pardon my French, but you’re an asshole! Asshole!”Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (1986)

When a very proper person uses foul language or taboo words “accidentally,” they can get away with it carte blanche by using the phrase “Please pardon my French.” This phrase is spoken in an attempt to excuse the user of profanity or curses in the presence of those offended by it under the pretense of that the words being spoken are part of a foreign language. In fact, the speaker and listener are both well aware that the phrase or word is indeed English. So why not “Pardon my Spanish” or “Pardon my Italian”? Why is use of this phrase to disguise an improper “false step” or faux pas, so very French?

“Please pardon my French” may have originated from the constant warfare between England and France. Beginning as early as the Norman Conquest in 1066, the French were looked down upon while also pissing the English off. By 1337 when the two countries began the Hundred Years War, the English opinion of the French was pretty low. Centuries later, the British brought their hatred of the French into the American colonies when anything “French” was associates with indecent behavior – like swearing and kissing or even farting! In the early 1800’s, words like the “French pox” (venereal disease) the “French novel” (pornography) and “French Letters” (condoms) became part of the local vernacular and just the simple word “French” began to be applied to anything pornographic or profane.

French

Download window 7 service pack 1 iso. Thus, today, we have this idiomatic expression “Please pardon my French” incorporated into our English vocabulary as an apology for using obscene language.You can like us on facebook, join us on twitter or read and contribute to our blog: www.pleasepardonourfrench.com

C’est la vie. Touche!

Colourpop Pardon Your French

Thank you to listener Richard from MA for correcting us!

Pardon Our Frenchies

Today’s opening question, about grammatical “mistakes” in popular songs, was the worst I’ve ever heard on the program. It propagated the false idea that the normative or prescriptive approach to English grammar provides a guide to speaking correctly. I’m sure other linguists will chime in on this issue, but I could not let one panelist’s remark get by without a comment. The panelist (I didn’t catch her name) said that sentences like “It’s me” would be impossible in other European languages. In fact it’s been several centuries since speakers of French would say “Ce suis je” or “C’est il” instead of the long-since normal “C’est moi” or “C’est lui.” English thus followed the natural development from “It is I” to “It’s me,” despite the best efforts of prescriptivists who believed that English should be guided by the rules of Latin grammar with its predicate nominatives, etc. And unless you don’t believe in poetic language, speaking of “lonely nights” is perfectly good English.