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How to Use White Space in Web Design

Whitespace, also known as negative space, is a part of the page that has been left unmarked, left blank or the page’s empty space. In the world of web designing, white space refers to the space between images, columns, text, graphics, and other components. This space is intentionally left untouched to smooth everything out and turn the page into something amazing. Whitespace also aims to show that simple designs are elegant and a page doesn’t have to fill its layout with graphics and text to convey a message that’s clear and direct.

Even though it is termed as white space, it doesn’t have to exactly mean that it has to be white. Pluto font free mac downloads. The blank space may be coloured, blue, green, red, etc. as long as it doesn’t have any graphical and text elements. Whitespace is also linked to style and intricacy since it’s an approach to organizing elements and help users in attending to particular elements.

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  • The white space all appears even around the elements; however, the elements themselves have different sizes. White spaces will only work great along with well-made positive spaces. Make sure that the positive spaces of your page are layered, natural, interesting or enclosed by white spaces for a spectacular visual result.

Sort your content into spaces using hashtags and/or add them into custom filters. At your fingertips. All your options, spaces & filters available at a swipe with the gesture perfected to milliseconds after 100+ tests so that you get a flawless experience. Trapped white space refers to the space awkwardly boxed in between two or more design elements. The following figure illustrates how white space can get trapped within a blog header design. Trapped white space hinders the flow of design. The best fix is to adjust the other design elements in a way that eliminates bounded white space. Right now, spaces primarily support sharing and discussing Quora content, links, and posts. We're actively developing support for questions and answers that are unique to a space, in addition to other new features that will expand the toolkit available to space creators.

For you to have more white space in your layout and provide a much better outcome, begin by discerning a page’s every detail. Think about the images, words, menus, letters, items in a list, header, footer, and margins. Think of all the above mentioned elements, and try to provide more space between those elements, considering that you want to make something stylish and clear and at the same time improve the user experience. A good user experience means having enough space for elements to breathe and letting the eyes of the readers relax. Putting size 11 text and filling it in the bottom part of the page will not provide a good experience for the readers.

Below are tips on how to use white space effectively.

Use white space wisely

As previously discussed, white space is the blank area around a page’s design elements and it’s not necessarily white as other colors can be used. One of the feelings that a white space convey is open-air and calm feeling. It’s highly recommended to leave huge portions of white space surrounding the vital area of the page, which will make it more noticeable. A good example of a website that uses white space effectively is Apple’s website.

Obviously, the same concept applies in designing black or dark-coloured themed websites; however, having a dark background can somehow convey something different. Objects on a page that are surrounded by a huge dark background convey drama and excitement.

Let some elements float

Normally, layouts of web pages are equally geometric and boxy. Though it is usually a great idea to have all your elements align in a grid, if you follow this rule exactly your page can appear too rigid. To make the page noticeable, play around with the vital elements. Let a vital element break the rule a bit and fall outside the grid. This will help your page stand out.

Remember, less is more

Obviously, the less things you plan to put on your page, the easier it is to take into account floating elements and white space that stands out in the grid structure. Try to restrict the number of less trivial things on your page, and instead place these on another page that focuses on that particular element.

Layer elements by their importance

Distinguish a value proposition from actionable info on how to start with differentiating product offering with balance white space. Position the vital messages on the top of the page and use white spaces to guide the eyes of your readers from one content asset to another.

Avoid monotony

White space needs balance instead of symmetry. Even a site that’s made from the huge amount of images like Pinterest will try to avoid using images that have the same size. The white space all appears even around the elements; however, the elements themselves have different sizes. White spaces will only work great along with well-made positive spaces. Make sure that the positive spaces of your page are layered, natural, interesting or enclosed by white spaces for a spectacular visual result.

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Pay attention to micro white space

Micro white space can be seen inside individual design elements instead of the broad spaces in-between elements. The visual experience of users can be greatly affected by line spacing and letter spacing. All text, which includes button text, headers, and footers, must not look too cramped and hard to read. Links and navigational menus must also have micro white space to help improve reading.

The Bottom Line

White space doesn’t only generate balance and harmony, and aid in creating a design, it is also useful in leading a reader from one element to the next. A designer’s goal should include making sure a website looks simple and organized, and be able to provide information that readers will enjoy.

It’s vital that white space isn’t only considered as a “blank” space, it should be treated as the element of design that makes objects for a page to exist. It’s the space that helps in balancing things out in a page. Although white space is unquestionably something good to utilize, it can also be something that can produce a great amount of resistance between clients and web designers. This is mainly because most clients do not want to look at a huge amount of space on their sites, which leads to designers to have to talk about the importance of white space and its role in website designing.

Sure, at first glance, white space just seems to appear empty and ordinary. However, in the end, it will help the whole look and feel of the design of the site.

Tutorial empty spaces the blog exampleHome » Eclipse Projects » Sirius » Custom Layout for Containers
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Custom Layout for Containers[message #1403830]Mon, 28 July 2014 08:03
Aleksandar Kanchev
Messages: 4
Registered: July 2014
Hello, I'm new to creating diagram editors using frameworks like GMF and Sirius. However it looks quite easy creating diagram editors with Sirius, so we're giving it a try in our project. Currently we have a problem where we need a container with an advanced layout. Our goal could be achieved by chaining small containers together with the currently available layouts but this will complicate the graphical model and there are concerns about maintainability and performance.
One very nice solution would be if we could define our own layout manager, which would take care of the positions of the contained child nodes. Since we're new to Sirius (and GMF) we couldn't easily find the place where we could just plug our custom layout provider. I was hoping that someone with more experience might point us to the right direction or even better provide us with an example. Thanks!
Re: Custom Layout for Containers[message #1404011 is a reply to message #1403830]Tue, 29 July 2014 07:25
Florian Barbin
Messages: 253
Registered: August 2010
Hi Aleksandar,
Take a look on this post which is similar to your need:
https://www.eclipse.org/forums/index.php/mv/msg/639946/1234795/#msg_1234795
Regards,
Florian
On 07/28/2014 07:02 PM, Aleksandar Kanchev wrote:
> Hello, I'm new to creating diagram editors using frameworks like GMF and
> Sirius. However it looks quite easy creating diagram editors with
> Sirius, so we're giving it a try in our project. Currently we have a
> problem where we need a container with an advanced layout. Our goal
> could be achieved by chaining small containers together with the
> currently available layouts but this will complicate the graphical model
> and there are concerns about maintainability and performance.
>
> One very nice solution would be if we could define our own layout
> manager, which would take care of the positions of the contained child
> nodes. Since we're new to Sirius (and GMF) we couldn't easily find the
> place where we could just plug our custom layout provider. I was hoping
> that someone with more experience might point us to the right direction
> or even better provide us with an example. Thanks!
Re: Custom Layout for Containers[message #1404376 is a reply to message #1404011]Thu, 31 July 2014 17:01
Aleksandar Kanchev
Messages: 4
Registered: July 2014
Hi Florian,
thanks a lot for the quick answer. So far I found a nice documentation about layout providers and view ordering:
h_ttp://docs.obeonetwork.com/obeodesigner/6.2/viewpoint/developer/general/extensions-provide_custom_arrange-all.html
The concept seems quite easy to understand but I'm stuck at arranging the child views of a container. I'm trying to use the GridLayoutProvider for my diagram but it seems that it won't go down the hierarchy and order the views of containers.
For example the DefaultLayoutProvider would check if the current action is 'Arrange All' i.e. it has the Diagram view itself, then it'll check if there's a custom layout provider registered for that diagram and it'll discover the GridLayoutProvider that I registered. Then it'll always call the GridLayoutProvider with the children of the diagram which would be the single root element of the diagram. The logic at that point is always the same: arrange the current elements as grid (so 1x1 grid in this case) and layout the container of those elements (so the diagram itself). In another words:
DefaultLayoutProvider.layoutEditParts(GraphicalEditPart diagramEditPart, IAdaptable layoutHint):
-> GridLayoutProvider.layoutEditParts(diagramEditPart.getChildren(), layoutHint):
->-> childrenGrid = myViewOrdering.getSortedViewsAsGrid(diagramEditPart.getChildren())
->-> buildGridCommand(childrenGrid)
->-> buildContainerCommand(diagramEditPart)
Am I missing something important here?
Regards,
Aleksandar
Re: Custom Layout for Containers[message #1404458 is a reply to message #1404376]Fri, 01 August 2014 13:50
Florian Barbin
Messages: 253
Registered: August 2010
Hi Aleksandar,
The GridLayoutProvider doesn't handle the container hierarchy. The
GridLayoutProvider is actually used as part of the
OrderedTreeLayoutProvider but not as a 'ready to use' layout provider.
You could use it as your main structural layout in the case of your own
layout provider that will deal with the hierarchy.
Regards,
Florian
On 07/31/2014 07:01 PM, Aleksandar Kanchev wrote:
> Hi Florian,
>
> thanks a lot for the quick answer. So far I found a nice documentation
> about layout providers and view ordering:
>
> h_ttp://docs.obeonetwork.com/obeodesigner/6.2/viewpoint/developer/general/extensions-provide_custom_arrange-all.html
>
>
> The concept seems quite easy to understand but I'm stuck at arranging
> the child views of a container. I'm trying to use the GridLayoutProvider
> for my diagram but it seems that it won't go down the hierarchy and
> order the views of containers.
>
> For example the DefaultLayoutProvider would check if the current action
> is 'Arrange All' i.e. it has the Diagram view itself, then it'll check
> if there's a custom layout provider registered for that diagram and
> it'll discover the GridLayoutProvider that I registered. Then it'll
> always call the GridLayoutProvider with the children of the diagram
> which would be the single root element of the diagram. The logic at that
> point is always the same: arrange the current elements as grid (so 1x1
> grid in this case) and layout the container of those elements (so the
> diagram itself). In another words:
>
> DefaultLayoutProvider.layoutEditParts(GraphicalEditPart diagramEditPart,
> IAdaptable layoutHint):
> -> GridLayoutProvider.layoutEditParts(diagramEditPart.getChildren(),
> layoutHint):
> ->-> childrenGrid =
> myViewOrdering.getSortedViewsAsGrid(diagramEditPart.getChildren())
> ->-> buildGridCommand(childrenGrid)
> ->-> buildContainerCommand(diagramEditPart)
>
> Am I missing something important here?
>
> Regards,
> Aleksandar
Re: Custom Layout for Containers[message #1404688 is a reply to message #1404458]Tue, 05 August 2014 06:08
Aleksandar Kanchev
Messages: 4
Registered: July 2014
Hi Florian,
thanks again for your prompt reply! I kind of figured that out after digging through the code and trying to make sense out of it. For someone who's new to GEF, GMF and Sirius this wasn't quite an easy task. I have to say that looking through the implementation of ecoretools 2.0 provided me some clarity about alternative solution.
In our case we must support a diagram with up to 3000 container nodes directly attached to the root diagram node. Within each of them 6 small lists and around 20 editable labels have to be displayed. At first I was thinking about providing inline editing but for this the VSM (.odesign) is getting quite complicated and hence my concern about performance. While looking at ecoretools 2.0 I saw that it's possible to render the string representation of EMF feature via custom service. Editing isn't inline but with the help of wizards which support validation. Such implementation is very lightweight and easy for me to understand. I think I'll go for it.
Nevertheless we'll need to use different layout manager for some Containers/Compartments than the default RegionContainerLayoutManager. I saw that it's possible to provide a different EditPart instance based on a VISUAL_ID. That's how nodes with transparency are implemented within ecoretools 2.0. I tried that approach and provided my own version of DNodeContainerViewNodeContainerCompartment2EditPart to sirius. I tried overriding the getLayoutManager() method and providing GridLayout for the figure but it didn't work. The diagram won't open at all and I'll get a very long stack trace which get's stuck at validation() and isMirrored() methods. Google gave me a hint that it might be something with a XYLayout but it makes no sense to me. Do you know what might be the cause or can you give me a reference to some documentation or examples about using different layouts within containers/compartments?
Cheers
Aleksandar
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