Ybreaking Pointdialectical Behavioral Training


The MDQuit Resource Center developed and is disseminating a training program titled, “Breaking the Habit in Behavioral Health (BH2): New Hope for Clients Who Smoke”* for behavioral health providers across Maryland. Scheduled trainings take place at UMBC's South Campus Research & Technology Park, Halethorpe, MD 21227 -- please see the registration form and confirmation email for exact building location.

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Breaking the Habit in Behavioral Health (BH2)
The MDQuit Resource Center developed and is disseminating a training program titled, “Breaking the Habit in Behavioral Health: New Hope for Clients Who Smoke (BH2)' for behavioral health providers across Maryland. The scheduled trainings will take place at UMBC South Campus Research & Technology Park, Halethorpe, MD 21227. Scroll down to our list of trainings for more details on BH2.

BH2 TRAINING DATES

Registrations for Spring 2020 BH2 Trainings are now open!

The trainings will take place on the following dates:

The training scheduled for April 22nd, 2020 has been cancelled.

Friday June 5th, 2020

To register for the 6/5/20, please click here.

If you have a training request, please fill out our Training Request Form(link is external) or contact us at [email protected](link sends e-mail).

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Please see the list of trainings offered and supported by MDQuit outlined below. If you do not see a description that meets your agency’s needs, please contact a Center Specialist and we can work with you to see if we can tailor a training to your needs and/or the populations served at your agency.

TO REQUEST TRAINING: If you are interested in hosting a training event for your organization/group, please fill out the application linked below:

Upon receipt of the Training Request Form, a Center Specialist will be in touch with you by phone to coordinate training details.

IMPORTANT: Space is limited! Trainings are free of cost and we provide training materials. Trainings allow for a maximum of 20 participants. CEUs will be provided for either half (3) or full day (6) attendance.

*There are two formats available for the above trainings:
Single Session (Morning): Trainees are taught how to work with clients who smoke and are given a tailored, multi-component single session protocol (for use in individual or group sessions), as well as a brief intervention protocol, to help prepare behavioral health clients to quit using tobacco.
Training Length: 3 hrs
Multiple Session (Morning and Afternoon): In addition to the single session content, trainees are taught how to work with clients who smoke and are given a flexible and interactive multiple session smoking cessation group protocol, as well as a brief intervention protocol. This tailored, multi-component protocol will assist providers in conducting groups geared to help behavioral health clients to quit using tobacco.
Training Length: 6 hrs

Sponsored by MDQuit

University of Maryland Baltimore County, Department of Psychology

1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250

Co-sponsored by the Maryland Behavioral Health Administration’s Office of Workforce Development and Training. The Office of Workforce Development and Training is an approved sponsor of the Maryland Board of Social Work Examiners for 3 or 6 Continuing Education Units (Category I) for licensed social workers in MD; as a sponsor of 3 or 6 Continuing Education Units acceptable to the MD Board of Examiners of Psychologists; and 3 or 6 Continuing Education Units (Category A) by the Maryland Board of Professional Counselors and Therapists, and the MD Association of Prevention Professionals & Advocates upon completion of this training and a completed evaluation. The Office of Workforce Development and Training maintains responsibility for this program.

Leanne Page, M.Ed, BCBA

bSci21 Contributing Writer

“Dear Behavior BFF, I need some serious help with dinnertime. My two sons argue, yell, goof off, refuse to eat, you name it. We can’t go out to restaurants and turn down any dinner invites from friends. They make dinner a miserable experience for us. Please help!”

Mealtimes can be hard. I’ve actually written about it before, geared specifically towards toddlers. There are lots of positive behavior supports you can use to increase desired behaviors at the dinner table. In the interest of not overwhelming you with a barrage of ideas- let’s focus on just one research-based strategy for teaching and increasing desired behaviors: Behavior Skills Training.

What is Behavior Skills Training, or BST? BST is a research-based strategy to teach new skills. It has been defined as “a procedure consisting of instruction, modeling, behavioral rehearsal, and feedback that is used to teach new behaviors or skills” (Miltenberger, 2004). Learn more about BST in a previous bSci21 article here.

There are four steps: (1) instructions; (2) modeling; (3) rehearsal and (4) feedback.

Step 1: Instructions

Tell your sons what the expected behaviors are at dinner time. This is not a lecture, this is just giving instructions. Be clear and concise. Define the desired behaviors in simple, clear terms. Use observable behaviors, not broad adjectives. Prioritize the top ones (maybe 3) or this list could go on and on.

Here’s an example: “At the table, the expected behaviors are: use a medium level voice volume at most, eat the food given to you, and follow directions from parents with no more than 2 reminders.”

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Step 2: Modeling

Act out the expected behaviors you just gave during the instructions portion of BST. This means to physically do each one. You can give multiple examples of how to do the desired behaviors. This is not a lecture or a time to talk more about the expected behaviors. It’s a time for your children to watch you engage in the appropriate behaviors. For your specific situation, it would be helpful to not do this during dinnertime. Act it out at a separate time when you will be the only person with a plate of food as part of your act. You don’t want your children to be doing anything else but watching you.

For example: “Do you hear my voice level? This is a medium and I won’t get any louder.” Take bites of food. Make polite conversation with whoever is around. Let your kids give you instructions and follow them with no more than 2 reminders.

Step 3: Rehearsal

It’s time to practice with your sons. Again, I wouldn’t do this at dinnertime, but practice in sessions at other times of the day. It doesn’t have to be a big undertaking, just a few minutes here and there. Take turns being the parent or the child if that increases participation. The key here is that you practice and rehearse until they get it right. Don’t role-play one time and expect dinner to be miraculously smooth that evening. Practice, practice, practice.

Step 4: Feedback

Giving specific feedback once the skills are being practiced in the real world (aka at dinnertime and not during practice sessions) helps to teach and maintain new schools. This doesn’t just mean corrective feedback. Adele 25 zip download. Instead of spending your time nagging about the desired behaviors, focus on giving praise and attention for all the appropriate behaviors your children do engage in. When needed, give corrective feedback with instructions. Don’t make it a criticism or a punishment. Just tell them the desired behavior you are looking for and how to get there.

Here are a few examples:

That was such a funny story! Thank you for using a nice voice volume. You are hilarious!”

“Wow, you ate all your dinner! Should we have some extra free time before bed to celebrate?”

“Your voice is starting to get too loud. I’d love to talk with you about your day or tell jokes as long as you keep your volume at a medium level.”

The rehearsal/ role-play step can feel pretty silly for adults, especially the first time. But practicing until you get it right can teach new skills efficiently. And if you take turns acting out different parts of the scenario, it often turns into an enjoyable activity with plenty of giggles!

Don’t just take my word for it. Learn more about BST with the resources below – it’s a powerful tool that is easy to implement and can be applied to all kinds of situations and new behaviors to be taught!

Gianoumis, S., Seiverling, L., & Sturmey, P. (2012). The effects of behavior skills training on correct teacher implementation of natural language paradigm teaching skills and child behavior. Behavioral Interventions, 27(2), 57-74.

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Miles, N. I., & Wilder, D. A. (2009). The effects of behavioral skills training on caregiver implementation of guided compliance. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 42(2), 405-410.

Miltenberger, R. (2004). Behaviour Modification: principles and procedure (3rd ed.) Belmont, CA. Wadsworth Publishing.

Miltenberger, R. G., Flessner, C., Gatheridge, B., Johnson, B., Satterlund, M., & Egemo, K. (2004). Evaluation of behavioral skills training to prevent gun play in children. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 37(4), 513-516.

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy Dbt Techniques

Reid, D. H. (2012). Supervisor’s Guidebook: Evidence-based Strategies for Promoting Work Quality and Enjoyment Among Human Service Staff. Habilitative Managment Consultants.

Ward‐Horner, J., & Sturmey, P. (2012). Component analysis of behavior skills training in functional analysis. Behavioral Interventions, 27(2), 75-92.

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy Training

Leanne Page, M.Ed, BCBA has worked with kids with disabilities and their parents in a variety of settings for over 10 years. She has taught special education classes from kindergarden-grade 12, from self-contained to inclusion. Leanne has also managed a center providing ABA services to children in 1:1 and small group settings. She has extensive experience in school and teacher training, therapist training, parent training, and providing direct services to children and families in a center-based or in-home therapy setting. Since becoming a mom, Leanne has a new mission to share behavior analytic practices with a population she knows needs it- all moms of littles! Leanne does through her site parentingwithaba.org and through her book ‘Parenting with Science: Behavior Analysis Saves Mom’s Sanity”. You can contact her at [email protected]